Why Publish Your Story

Today I want to talk about publishing. While storytelling may not be your G-d given talent, it’s a skill like any other and can be improved upon. Everyone has a story to tell and I think everyone can write a book. It’s a lot like starting a workout regiment. If you have the discipline and dedicate time to daily manageable goals you will reach the finished product without feeling overwhelmed.

Once you get started on your writing journey, you will want to think about distribution. I have experience with a few options, but if you’re just starting out I recommend KDP, which is Kindle Direct Publishing. You can capture up to 70% of the royalties of each digital book copy sold and if you feel like most of your sales come from Amazon you can join the select program and be exclusive to amazon in exchange for the ability to share your work with Kindle Unlimited. Kindle Unlimited is great because it can help boost your book’s overall ranking and you get paid per page read by members (think of it like Netflix for books).

You can also create paperbacks on KDP, but if you’re interested in physical books there are other avenues with more options (like Ingram Spark) however I’m going to stick with KDP for the rest of this post. It’s effective, and simple. A great place for beginners looking to control their publishing fate.

So, why is writing a book important? It can help establish your brand; people still love to read books and what better way to capture your entire story than to write a book about it? It can be fiction (a parable or a fable), it can be nonfiction, it can be whatever you want–you could publish a cook book if that’s what you think fits your brand.

Books are timeless. Books go up on Amazon and you don’t have to think about them ever again. You could create some ads to draw traffic and reference them in your videos but they aren’t costing you any money by sitting there. You aren’t paying for warehouse space or anything.

At close to no cost (outside of time, professional editing, and cover art) you’ve opened yourself up to passive revenue streams that you don’t have to actively promote, that you don’t have to run the fulfillment services for, that you don’t have to handle shipping costs or anything. Your book is out there for the world to see and you can promote it however you want.

This isn’t a strategy that’s going to make you a millionaire, but it feels great to wake up in the morning and see 10 people were interested in your story and purchased a copy. This happened to me recently. I saw I had 40 bucks moved to my bank account from Amazon royalty services. I was stressed with exams, and feeling a little overwhelmed, and this put a smile on my face. It’s fun to be able to treat someone to dinner with royalties–it made me feel like a real writer. I think Stephen King once described talent as being able to pay the electric bill with something you wrote.

To conclude this post, writing a book is a great way to encapsulate your story, diversify your brand, and create passive revenue streams. It’s also a way to expand global reach, and grow your business affordably, by offering a new product with very low upfront costs AND offers you the ability to build an infrastructure around the culture you’re trying to implement into your business.

100 Newsletter Subscribers

Today I want to tell you about how I grew my mailing list from zero to over 100 people for free and the steps I’m going to take down the line to continue its growth. One caveat to this advice is you must have a published book. Now, I say this all the time, everyone has a book in them. It doesn’t have to be fantasy or fiction. It could be nonfiction, it could be personal stories, it could be a collection of essays on your travels across the continental United States. Whatever you want as long as it’s published and available digitally. You also have to be willing to give it away for free. This book will be your anchor–it will be your funnel for those who have not heard your voice yet but are interested in what you have to say. You will draw new audience members and through the power of your newsletter you will hopefully convert them into diehard fans.

Let’s get into the good stuff. I started off with maybe three subscriber so it’s not quite zero to 100 but the three subscribers were something like a friend of mine and my parents. I identified the book I wanted to give away for free. It was Just Under the Sky, the first novella I ever published and I published with this small press down in Texas called Weasel Press.

It wasn’t Amazon exclusive, so I had flexibility. If a book is Amazon exclusive you can only run a giveaway on other platforms up to a certain percent of the book. I made a free account on a website called instafreebie, it’s now prolificworks but from what I’ve seen it operates the same way.

I uploaded an .epub copy of my manuscript but I believe any digital format works and individuals on the platform downloaded it for free. If you have a free account they do not have to opt into your newsletter to receive a free account. You will probably not receive many subs. HOWEVER you are still able to participate in the group giveaways. This was how I received all my subs with a free account. I signed up for as many group giveaways as I could–each giveaway has a theme so you have to make sure your book meets the criteria but there are plenty of options.

Not all group giveaways require email sign ups but you will gain a few more here and there. I managed to land mine in four group giveaways in the same month and after three weeks I collected around 350 subscribers! The first two emails were the most tumultuous. I received some subscribers who joined for the one free book and unsubscribed once they received their first email, but by the third email I had my true list set and a new audience interested in my content. I lost about 180 subs when Europe passed GDPR and I had to ask my subscribers to opt in to a new newsletter–I expected to take a loss–no one likes a hassle but I walked away with around 120.

Now, I mentioned before this was all with the free option. The paid option, which starts at $20 requires those who sign up for your book, even if it’s not in a group giveaway, to opt in to your newsletter. The site has a decent infrastructure in place, so even without promotion individuals still find your book and download it. I think my solo giveaway averaged about three downloads per day on its own before I took it down, with higher spikes on the days I shared across social media.

So if you want to get started, first tip is obviously have a book either in the process of being published or published already. Don’t stress about this, everyone has a book in them. It doesn’t have to be a 900 page monster, as long as it’s high quality you can giveaway a free 80 page book. Publish it through Draft 2 Digital so it’s available across all platforms (Amazon, B&N, Google, iBooks) and finally give your book away for free on prolific works.

I hope this helps!

If you have any questions on publishing a book never hesitate to reach out I’ll happily share all I know and be your accountability buddy.

Sony PlayStation​ Classic Game Console Release

What do you think of the new PlayStation classic release? For those of you unaware, Sony is releasing a small digital device with a 20 game library from their PS1 collection. The device is meant to just plug in and play. Users can play with up to 2 controllers.

The full list of games being released:

• Battle Arena Toshinden

• Cool Boarders 2

• Destruction Derby

• Final Fantasy VII

• Grand Theft Auto

• Intelligent Qube

• Jumping Flash

• Metal Gear Solid

• Mr. Driller

• Oddworld: Abe’s Oddysee

• Rayman

• Resident Evil Director’s Cut

• Revelations: Persona

• Ridge Racer Type 4

• Super Puzzle Fighter II Turbo

• Syphon Filter

• Tekken 3

• Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six

• Twisted Metal

• Wild Arms

I think it’s a great idea! They’re clearly cashing in on our nostalgia and their price $99.99 plays with our psychology so we can think we win by recapturing this era of gaming for under $100. I know some people think there are some serious snubs on here, and I get it but all in all, how do you sum up such a large video game era? I mean we get new games every day directly delivered to our phones now. Sony couldn’t just add their entire library to this—I mean maybe they could’ve—okay they probably could’ve, but let’s be real, they’re not looking to capture the entire nostalgia market with one product—they need room to upgrade and I don’t fault them for giving themselves some room to grow.

I do think it’s interesting to see what they valued as the top 20 classic games on their original console. They clearly have better access to the data than we do so what does that say about us? I thought for sure something like Mega Man would’ve been on here. Also, I know as far as Final Fantasy is concerned they had to go with VII but I keep thinking about the first time I’ve ever played a final fantasy game it was IX. I had never played anything so cool–that’s honestly the game that made me love Sony. I know this sounds cheesy, and to some video games are just a waste of time, but the Final Fantasy series really taught me the importance of storytelling and how it can turn a mild form of entertainment into a mindblowing experience.

I think this system will see upgrades. I know they said that you can’t add any now but I do think down the line they are going to improve on this, they may be taking their time because it’s not difficult for people to find these games online using an emulator. Maybe as they flame the nostalgia there will be more cries to add more–I mean as it is, people calling for snubs isn’t a negative for branding–it’s an opportunity for future releases.

What do you all think?